Kora - The Third Culture Project

 
 

Calling all youth of African descent in Auckland who are interested in African representation and identity in the media. 

I am looking for a diverse group to work with to create content for social media and media. 

"The Kora is a 21st-string West African instrument and the strings represent the many facets of our lives that make us and the stretched strings represent trying to connect our African identity with diasporic relevance." - Osei

Kora - The Third Culture Research Project is a creative project that intends to develop and create content and narratives about New Zealand African youth identity. 

What does that mean?

For the next two months we will be working together to create content for social media and media, that can include literature, videos, photography, basically whatever it is that you want to do to represent your identity. 

Who is the facilitator?

My name is Makanaka Tuwe and I am the Founder and Creative Director of Afrika on My Sleeve. I am currently in the process of completing a Master in International Communication focusing on expanding the Africana narrative in the media space specifically Sub-Saharan African youth in Auckland, New Zealand. As part of my thesis I am facilitating Kora - The Third Culture Research Project.

My role in the project is to be a co-participate as well as document the process of executing this project and how it can inform strategy and policy. The significance of this project is its potential to generate content and inform media (community and mainstream). Additionally the process can be applied for the creation of a youth empowerment programme not only for African youth but for other communities in New Zealand.

Last year I collaborated with photographic artist Julia Glover and designed and executed the 'I AM Project'. Using photographs, social media and storytelling the purpose of the project was to counter one-dimensional narratives about people of African descent in New Zealand. This project is a continuation of the project and this time around the stories and conversations can manifest as literature, photographs, videos, podcasts, whatever we collectively decide we want it to be.

How do you contribute?

You contribute by attending three workshops that will be inclusive, participatory and have sessions with insiders/experts in the creative industry. At the workshops we will:

  • Establish what the perception and representation of African identity is and whether those perceptions and representations match our reality
  • Design content projects (whatever you want to do) that will collaboratively feed and link into the theme: Conversations with African youth
  • Create the content for social media and media 

The workshops will be three hours long and will be interactive. Snacks will be provided.

You don't need to be a creative or professional to participate, all you need to have is an interest in voicing your identity. 

Timeline

Introduction – 2 July
Workshop One – 9 July
Workshop Two – 23 July
Progress Meeting - 6 August

Workshop Three – 20 August

If you are interested in being a part of this project,click below to register your interest. We will be hosting an information & sign up evening for the project on the 2nd of July.

Even if you aren't sure come along and give some feedback  

Only Auckland residents aged between 18 and 25 can participate in this project. 

Research Question

The creative project will be based on the following key research and guiding sub-questions:


How can participatory visual methodologies within an African indigenous research framework be used to enable authentic voice presentations of Sub-Saharan African youth in New Zealand? 

Sub Questions


1. How visible are indigenous African worldviews in African youth identity construction in this research process?


2. How can an African indigenous framework be used to explore the experiences of African youth in NZ? 


3. What are the challenges/opportunities in producing visual participatory outputs that will incorporate an indigenous research framework?


4. How can participatory visual methodologies be used to situate identity, migration and representation of African youth in New Zealand? 

We are looking forward to embarking on this journey with you,

Amandla!

 
 
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